NC. 25. I am a Potterhead, Whovian, Oncer, general geek. I am addicted to art in general, film, and this ridiculous and amazing universe. Also I like to make stuff. All kinds of stuff... check out my craft blog at crannycrafts.tumblr.com

 

Inspirational Southern California family not only feeds themselves but earns $20,000 a year selling the surplus organic food they produce on their 1/10th acre backyard urban farm. They’ve been doing it for 10 years so I’m sure that experience factors into their amazing success but it certainly shouldn’t take 10 years to figure out how to effectively feed yourself or a family or two or three!

The one thing everybody raves about but I’m not a fan of is using cooking oil to fuel your car. “It’s free!” they say. I know we eat a lot of fast food in the US but how many people can realistically get free fry oil to power their cars every place they go? There’s not even enough fry oil for everyone to pay for it to power all of our vehicles.

monkeysmeanbusiness:

utteranonymity:

Fun little trick I learned in therapy: validation. When someone is upset, don’t try to fix the problem, point out the cause, or tell them it could be worse. Just validate their emotions. Be like, ‘shit yeah man, that sucks. I’m sorry you’re going through that. I’m here for you.’ That’s literally all you have to do to make them feel better. Thank you and goodnight.

A-fucking-men.

for bi girls

cigarettes-and-cereal:

When I first started college I wore my LGBTQ button
on my book bag with conviction
but now I wear it with shame
because a bisexual college girl has become a cliche.

My closet has many rooms.

I am tired of being questioned by professors
if I am gay because most of my protagonists are.
I am tired of my boyfriend suggesting we have a threesome
because we would both enjoy it.
I am tired of being the exception to monogamy.
I am tired of being a phase
when phase is just another word for slut in my case
I am tired of being painted as a drunk straight girl
my feelings for my best friend in high school
cannot be compared to a hangover
I am tired of feeling guilty
for having a boyfriend all through high school
because even though I didn’t love him
he helped me survive in a small town
where too many LGBTQ buttons
were met with violence.

When I first came out to my mother
she slammed the closet door in my face.
She said bisexuality did not exist
that you are either straight or gay
and being gay is fine
but since I was her daughter she knew
that I was doing this for attention.


She knew that I was doing this for attention.

I am tired of being a private spectacle.
I am tired of being a conversation
you save until the fifth date
I have opened the closet door but I have not stepped out
because I am tired of being a trope
but if i’m going to be a stereotype
at least make me a permanent one.


I am tired of being seen as temporary.

To my boyfriend, I am tired of proving my commitment to you.
To my gay friends, I am sorry I didn’t fight the same battle as you.
To my fellow bisexual college girls, be proud.
To my mother,

do I have your attention now?

did-you-kno:

Many babies in Finland sleep in cardboard boxes with a mattress on the bottom.  It is part of a welcome package that has been supplied by their government for the last 75 years.
Source

And their infant mortality rate is dramatically lower than other western countries because of it!

did-you-kno:

Many babies in Finland sleep in cardboard boxes with a mattress on the bottom.  It is part of a welcome package that has been supplied by their government for the last 75 years.

Source

And their infant mortality rate is dramatically lower than other western countries because of it!

mother-of-beasties:

xtoxictears:

This is one of my favourite pictures of Kagura.:’) She likes to sit like a people and watch the laptop/TV

oh my God that is the cutest snake ever.

mother-of-beasties:

xtoxictears:

This is one of my favourite pictures of Kagura.:’) She likes to sit like a people and watch the laptop/TV

oh my God that is the cutest snake ever.

thealoofnightowl:

jackfrostciicle:

jarexz:

loveatitsfinest:

bestrooftalkever:

party-wok:

julierthanyou:

clambistro:

Ahh, it’s back

i have disproportionately strong feelings about this.

every time i say “nah i’m not gonna watch it again.” BUT I STILL DO EVERY TIME.

YEAUGH

the comments are painfully accurate. 

the freeze-frame makes it even more incredible

every time

Omg, I love this so much. This literally made my day lololol I can’t even.

(Source: videohall)

Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought

Most of what we know — or think we know — about how kids learn comes from classroom practice and behavioral psychology. Now, neuroscientists are adding to and qualifying that store of knowledge by studying the brain itself. The latest example: new research in the journal suggests a famous phenomenon known as the “fourth-grade shift” isn’t so clear-cut.

"The theory of the fourth-grade shift had been based on behavioral data," says the lead author of the study, Donna Coch. She heads the Reading Brains Lab at Dartmouth College.

The assumption teachers make: “In a nutshell,” Coch says, “by fourth grade you stop learning to read and start reading to learn. We’re done teaching the basic skills in third grade, and you go use them starting in the fourth.”

But, Coch’s team found, that assumption may not be true. The study involved 96 participants, divided among third-, fourth-, and fifth-graders as well as college students. All average readers, the subjects wore noninvasive electrode caps that could swiftly pick up electrical activity in the brain.

They were shown strings of letters/symbols that fell into four different categories: words (“bed”); pseudo-words (“bem”); strings of letters (“mbe”) and finally, strings of meaningless symbols (@#*). The researchers then observed the subjects’ brains as they reacted, within milliseconds, to each kind of stimulus.

The children in the study handled the first three categories roughly as well as the college students, meaning their brains responded at a speed that suggested their word processing was automatic. The difference came with the fourth category, meaningless symbols. As late as fifth grade, children needed to use their conscious minds to decide whether the symbols were a word.

The study suggests there is nothing so neat as a fourth-grade shift. It found that third-graders exhibit some signs of automatic word processing while fifth-graders are still processing words differently from adults.

Why is this important? “From my perspective, this concept of automaticity is key to learning to read,” says Coch. “If you’re not automatic, you’re using a lot of effort to decode and understand individual words, meaning you have fewer resources for comprehension.”

Coch’s team also administered a written test, covering the same set of real words, fake words, and symbol strings. This task was designed to test the participants’ conscious word processing, a much slower procedure.

Interestingly, most of the 96 participants got a nearly perfect score on the written test, showing that their conscious brains knew the difference between words and non-words. Future research will no doubt try to pinpoint when that process becomes automatic … research that could change the way we teach reading in the higher grades.